All Good People Here, Ashley Flowers

The sun is setting on a tall red barn with a smaller house next to it. There are trucks parked in front of the house. The title is in black over the darkening blue sky.

Margot has returned home to take care of her ailing uncle. But a case she recently researched brought her back to her childhood and the death of her best friend, January. With new girls going missing, it has to be related. As Margot investigates the circumstances of what happened in her youth with what’s happening today, she knows she has a story that will get her a job so she can better take care of her uncle, who’s getting worse by the day.

Honestly, this was almost a 5-star book. But that ending? *screams in nooooo!* This book was so hard to put down. Margot was a workaholic who often put her uncle at home by himself, which was selfish because she kept flitting off when it was clear he couldn’t be left alone. It was through her persistence that she shined. But then, Flowers gave us this ending, which was an utter disappointment. While it wasn’t an ending I wanted, I could have dealt with it, but it was so utterly unsatisfying. But the journey to get there was a blast, and I enjoyed that journey. Thank you, Random House/Ballantine, for sending this along!

Book Links (releasing August 16th)

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Amazon
Bookshop
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About the Book

You can’t ever know for sure what happens behind closed doors.

Everyone from Wakarusa, Indiana, remembers the infamous case of January Jacobs, who was discovered in a ditch hours after her family awoke to find her gone. Margot Davies was six at the time, the same age as January—and they were next-door neighbors. In the twenty years since, Margot has grown up, moved away, and become a big-city journalist. But she’s always been haunted by the feeling that it could’ve been her. And the worst part is, January’s killer has never been brought to justice.

When Margot returns home to help care for her uncle after he is diagnosed with early-onset dementia, she feels like she’s walked into a time capsule. Wakarusa is exactly how she remembers—genial, stifled, secretive. Then news breaks about five-year-old Natalie Clark from the next town over, who’s gone missing under circumstances eerily similar to January’s. With all the old feelings rushing back, Margot vows to find Natalie and to solve January’s murder once and for all.

But the police, Natalie’s family, the townspeople—they all seem to be hiding something. And the deeper Margot digs into Natalie’s disappearance, the more resistance she encounters, and the colder January’s case feels. Could January’s killer still be out there? Is it the same person who took Natalie? And what will it cost to finally discover what truly happened that night twenty years ago?


Read this review on Goodreads and Bookbub.

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